Italian scientists have announced the world's first active vaccine against COVID-19

Italian scientists have announced the world's first active vaccine against COVID-19, Jon Smitt
Italian scientists have announced the world's first active vaccine against COVID-19

Italian scientists have announced the world's first active vaccine against COVID-19

Italian scientists have announced that they have managed to create the world's first active vaccine against the coronavirus COVID-19, which will help in the fight against a pandemic. The drug has already been tested on laboratory mice, soon it will begin testing in humans, reports the Daily Mail.

It is noted that the researchers introduced the experimental mice serum, and then analyzed the antibodies. Preliminary tests have shown that antibodies after the drug can stop coronavirus infection. According to Italian experts, such antibodies can neutralize the virus in the cells of the human body.

“As far as we know, we were the first in the world to demonstrate the neutralization of coronavirus with a vaccine,” said the head of an Italian company that develops serum.

He said that large-scale trials of the drug are planned for the fall.
The Italian team compared a single dose of five different vaccine candidates for mice at the Spallanzani hospital in Rome. All DNA-based vaccines; the method involved introducing a small amount of the cloned genetic code from the virus into the body. DNA or RNA-based vaccines are not produced with attenuated or deactivated virus or virus elements, which means that they can be produced on a massive scale in the laboratory without the need for any fresh samples. The DNA in the vaccine enters the recipient's cells, and the body reacts as if it were infected with a real virus, causing an immune response. The absence of the virus, however, means that their health is not at risk.
According to the researchers, each candidate produced a “strong antibody response” against the virus in 14 days.
Takis said two of them were recognized as “the best candidates for future clinical research.”
Antibodies, substances created in response to the virus, were taken from the blood of mice and added to human cells grown in a Petri dish.
They worked against infection and successfully prevented the binding of SARS-CoV-2 virus to human cells and its infection.
According to the Italian news agency ANSA, Mr. Aurisicchio said this week: “This is the most advanced phase of testing a candidate vaccine created in Italy.
“According to the Spallanzani Hospital, as far as we know, we were the first in the world to demonstrate the neutralization of coronavirus with a vaccine.
“We expect this to happen in people.” He added that human trials are expected "after this summer", implying that they will begin in the fall.
Mr Aurisicchio added that this process could be accelerated if international organizations helped finance this work.
Takis said the results were "extremely positive" in a statement of April 10. Results are not available to the public.
Infectious disease experts today described the results as promising as scientists around the world continue to track down an effective vaccine.
But Dr. Andrew Preston, who specializes in microbial pathogenesis and vaccines at Bath University, added that they have a long way to go.
He told MailOnline: “Any vaccine that has reached development would show a response in mice. It would be surprising if they did not.
“I am sure that the vast majority of these projects would have the same effect. They went even further to see if antibodies have a function.

Italian scientists announced first active vaccine against COVID-19
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